Lesson Plans for 6th Grade
        For Gifted Class

Title :  "The School Play," by Gary Soto

Home Learning


OBJECTIVE(S)

Students will . . .
  •explore the key idea of overcoming fear
  •analyze plot
  •read a short story
  •monitor understanding
  •build vocabulary for reading and writing
  •distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words
  •identify and correct sentence fragments
  •use writing to analyze literature

Journal Writing::  Explain why a fear you have had was rational or irrational.  (From McDougal and Littell: Literature - 6th Grade Edition:) 

Discuss the kinds of fears people have and how people may overcome their fears. Discuss the differences between rational and irrational fears.  PairShare: How can our fears protect us from real dangers?


Materials:
McDougal and Littell: Literature - 6th Grade Edition

Work Sheets from McDougal and Littell: Literature - 6th Grade Edition: 
1.  "Literary Analysis of Plot"
2.  "Vocabulary Study - Context Clues"

Vocabulary Words to Look up using the text book:

1.  Denotation
2.  Connotation
3.  Sentence Fragmant

Grammar: Students will complete the Grammar Exercise on page 41.

                    IBO-MYP Area of Interaction: Health and Social Issues
                    Big Question:    What do you fear the most?
                    Unit Question:  How can our fears protect us from real danger?

                    What I want students to know: Everyone has fears.  Some of our fears are irrational, not based on sound reasoning.  Fears that are are rational - based on
experiences we have had or know about from the experiences of others - can help protect
us from harm's way.   For example, with Irene nearby, we can watch the weather report,
and properly prepare for a storm.

Assessment:  Students will be able to write a 250 word essay on how people can overcome
their fears (Advanced) and how fears can help people protect themselves from real danger (Gifted) In their essay, all students will be able to relate to the fear that the main character is able to overcome in Gary Soto's
The School Play
     For Advanced Classes

Title :  "The School Play," by Gary Soto

Home Learning


OBJECTIVE(S)
Students will . . .
  •explore the key idea of overcoming fear
  •analyze plot
  •read a short story
  •monitor understanding
  •build vocabulary for reading and writing
  •distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words
  •identify and correct sentence fragments
  •use writing to analyze literature

Journal Writing::  Write about a fear you once had or still have.  (From McDougal and Littell: Literature - 6th Grade Edition)

Discuss the different kinds of fears people have and how people may overcome their fears.Explain the  differences between rational and irrational fears. Discuss how our fears can protect us from real dangers?


Materials:

McDougal and Littell: Literature - 6th Grade Edition

Work Sheets from McDougal and Littell: Literature - 6th Grade Edition: 
1.  "Literary Analysis of Plot"
2.  "Vocabulary Study - Context Clues"

Vocabulary Words to Look up using the text book:
1.  Denotation
2.  Connotation
3.  Sentence Fragmant

Grammar;  Students will complete the Grammar Exercise on page 41.
Week of August 22, 2011
1. On the first two days, students will take notes on the Classroom Procedures and Expectations of Ms. Carlson-Yellen.
2. Students will write in their journals.
3. Students will copy down their Home Learning Assignment.
4.  Students will take the Baseline Reading Assessment.
a 5.  Exit Card:
Lesson
Objective:  Students will improve their essays about what they fear the most.

Agenda for 9/6

  1.  Do Now -Journal: 
  2.  Teacher will collect students' Simile Folders
  3.  Retake Test on Elements of Plot using Notes - Students will only write the answers to the questions given by the Teacher. (15 Minutes)
  4.  Peer Grade Test (7 minutes)
  5.  Students will be arranged into Differentiated Groups to work on editing and process writing to improve their essays.
Note:  Some students still have to write the essay.
All students must turn in a finished essay.                                                                                                              
Lesson for Advanced Students on September 6th
                                         Lesson for Gifted Students on September 7th
IF:  Information Text
Objective:  The student will identify cause and effect relationships.
Essential/Unit Question:  Are there two sides to a story?
Teacher and students discuss the times in real life there are two sides to a story.  When observing an event, people see things differently.  As stories are told, the versions vary according to who is telling the story.  Some people may stretch the truth -- and make up a fish tale. Students will read page 438 of McDougal-Littell's Literature-6th Grade Edition.

AGENDA:
1.  Do Now – Journal:
Students will write one page telling  the story of Cinderella from the viewpoint of the stepmother.  In the Disney version, the stepmother is called Lady Tremaine and the stepsisters are called Drizella and Anastasia Tremaine.  Students may make up their own names for the stepmother and step sisters. 

2.  Vocabulary (439): Define the following words and idioms: The student will use the book to define parody from the book and listen to the teacher for the idioms.  The student will write these definitions in their own notebooks.
a.  parody (An open-notebook pop quiz will be given to see is students are taking notes,)
b. What a pig!
c.  porker
d.  jazzed up the story

3.  Read aloud "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” -  (440-446)
4.  Go over Cause and Effect
5.  Students begin creating a Cause and Effect Chart in class, but complete it with illustrations at home.
6.  END LESSON:  Students write down the steps they need to get the online textbook.

                                                                                    
Home Learning
                                  Lesson for Advanced Students on September 8th
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs
(438 - 440)
Readability Scores: Lexile: 510

IF:  Information Text
Essential Question:  Are their two sides two every story?
Objective:  The student will identify cause and effect relationships.

AGENDA:
1.  Do Now – Journal: Are there two sides to a story?
The student will write a paragraph.  A paragraph has a least five sentences.  It has a beginning topic sentence.  Detail sentences supporting the topic sentence comprise the body of the paragraph (Two to three sentences.)  It ends with a concluding sentence and relates to the topic sentence,
2.  Vocabulary: Define the following words and idioms: The student will use the book to define parody from the book and listen to the teacher for the idioms.  The student will write these definitions in their own notebooks.
  a.  parody (An open-notebook pop quiz will be given to see is students are taking    
      notes,)
  b. What a pig!
  c.  porker
  d.  jazzed up the story
3.  Read aloud The True Story of the Three Little Pigs/
4.  Go over Cause and Effect
5.  Students create a Cause and Effect Chart

Home Learning 
lesson
Scroll Down to See Lessons
                                  Lesson for Gifted Students on September 9th


IF:  Information Text – Strongest Argument
Essential Question:  Can memories keep the past alive?
Objective:  The student will be able to determine which character has the strongest will in Nadia the Willful.
Objective:  Students will use context clues to understand the meaning of new vocabulary words..

AGENDA
    1.  Do Now-Journal: 
How can you preserve a memory?
    2.  Note Taking - Vocabulary
       
• Preserve
        • Theme
        • Four Types of Conflict
            1. Character against character (man vs. man)
            2. Character against self (man vs. self)
            3. Character against nature (man vs. nature)
            4. Character against society (man vs. society)

        • Context Clues
    3.  As we read
Nadia the Willful, by Sue Alexander, page 336, students will use context clues to understand new vocabulary words.
    4.  Exit Lesson: 
Students will write in their journals which character had the strongest argument and it with details from the story.

Home Learning
9/12
                              Lesson for Advanced Students for September 12th

IF:  Words and Phrases
Essential Question:  Can memories keep the past alive?
Objective:  Students will use context clues to understand the meaning of new vocabulary words..


AGENDA
   1.  Do Now-Journal: What memory in the past would you like to keep?
   2.  Note Taking - Vocabulary
        • Preserve
        • Theme
        • Four Types of Conflict
            1. Character against character (man vs. man)
            2. Character against self (man vs. self)
            3. Character against nature (man vs. nature)
            4. Character against society (man vs. society)
        • Context Clues
  
3. As we read Nadia the Willful, by Sue Alexander, page 336, students will use context clues to understand new vocabulary words.
   4.  Exit Lesson/Journal: What part of the lesson did you like best today and why?

Home Learning
9/13 and 9/15
                                             Gifted Lesson for 9/13 and 9/15
                                                     
Woodsong, by Gary Paulsen

9/13
IF:  Words and Phrases
AOI - the Environment
Essential Question:  Does nature demand respect?
Objectives: 
  The student will use context clues to understand new vocabulary words.
  The student will analyze and identify Author's Purpose.
  The student wil be able to read aloud with fluency, good pronunciation, and use the proper voice inflections.
  The student will explain how setting of a story can influence and have an impact on the main character. 
AGENDA

  1.  Do Now - Journal:  What wass your most memorable encounter with nature?  Describe this experience in your journal in at least one paragraph.  What did you learn from this experience?
  2.  Note Taking Skills: Students will write in their own notebooks the different reasons an author may use to have a purpose for his/her writing.  This is know as Author's Purpose.
  3.  Students will be called on to read aloud and recieve one grade for their reading skills.  As a student reads, he or she will be asked to use context clues to define new vocabulary words.
      Words to Know:
          •coherent
          •eject
          •hibernation
          •novelty
          •scavenge
          •truce
  4.  Students will use the book and the information on the board to copy the information below into their note books.
          • P – PERSUADE – convince, sway, argue for or against
          • I – INFORM – explain, show, tell, teach, give directions
          • E – ENTERTAIN – amuse, emotions, bring out senses
          • S – SHARE – feelings about an issue or event, share a personal experience about an event
  5. 
END LESSON: In the journal, the student will explain how setting of a story can influence and have an impact on the main character.   

HOME LEARNNING

9/15
IF:  Words and Phrases
AOI - the Environment
Essential Question: Does nature demand respect?
Objectives:
  The student will use context clues to understand new vocabulary words.
  The student will analyze and identify Author's Purpose.
  The student wil be able to read aloud with fluency, good pronunciation, and use the proper voice inflections.
  The student will explain how setting of a story can influence and have an impact on the main character. 

AGENDA
  1. DO NOW/JOURNAL: Explain how Gary Paulsen in "Woodsong" made his backyard real to you.
  2.  Using a PIES graphic organizer, students will analyze the reason Paulsen wrote Woodsong to identify Author's Purpose
  3. Display ART TRANSPARANCY - "Untitled," by Mateyard  (from Prentice-Hall, Inc.)
          • Prewriting:  Look carefully at the painting, write.and answer the following questions  Where is it set?  At what time of  day?  How can you tell?
Describe the foreground.  What might be the sources of the lights in the background? List your ideas about the painting.
          • Have students Pair/Share their ideas and then with the class
          • Now look at the painting again.  What is the mood of the painting?  After determining the mood of the work wht title would suggest this mood?
          • The artist has not given this painting a title.  Study the work.  What title would you give it?  Why?  Then write a 5 paragraph explanatory essay in which you state this title and give three reasons for your choice. (45 Minutes).
          • Pair/Share:  Read each other's essays.  Proofread each others essays and make corrections.
          • Switch your essays with another group.  Discuss the various titiles.  Which are the most suitable? Why?  

HOME LEARNNING
Scroll Down
                                                     Advanced Lesson for 9/14 and 9/16
                                                       Woodsong, by Gary Paulsen9/14
6th Advanced
AOI - ENVIRONMENRT
TITILE:  Woodsong, by Gary Paulsen and A Day in the life of Gary Paulsen
Essential Question:  Does Nature Demand Respect?

Objectives:
• The student will use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words.
• The student will analyze and categorize Author’s Purpose
• The student will be able to read aloud with fluency and good pronunciation
• The student will demonstrate good listening skills.

AGENDA:
1. DO NOW – JOURNAL - How does weather affect us? The U.S.? the world?
2. NOTE TAKING SKILLS: AUTHOR’S PURPOSE
• P – persuade
• I – inform
• E – entertain
• S – share thoughts and feelings
3. Read aloud and listen while others are reading.  Use context clues while reading to define unfamiliar words.  Determine main idea of a passage by summarizing the passage down into two sentences.
4. IDENTIFY AUTHOR’S PURPOSE – Students will use a graphic organizer to answer the questions about Author’s Purpose in the margins of the memoir and categorize them into the proper purpose the author used for writing.
5. END lesson:  What did you learn today?

HOME LEARNNING


9/15
IF:  Words and Phrases
AOI - the Environment
Essential Question:  Does nature demand respect?
Objectives: 
  The student will use context clues to understand new vocabulary words.
  The student will analyze and identify Author's Purpose.
  The student wil be able to read aloud with fluency, good pronunciation, and use the proper voice inflections.
  The student will explain how setting of a story can influence and have an impact on the main character. 

AGENDA
  1. DO NOW/JOURNAL: What did you learn about wildlife in Gary Paulsen's
Woodsong?
  2. Display ART TRANSPARANCY - "Untitled," by Mateyard  (from Prentice-Hall, Inc.)
          • Prewriting:  Look carefully at the painting, write.and answer the following questions  Where is it set?  At what time of  day?  How can you tell?
Describe the foreground.  What might be the sources of the lights in the background? List your ideas about the painting.
          • Have students Pair/Share their ideas and then with the class
          • Now look at the painting again.  What is the mood of the painting?  After determining the mood of the work wht title would suggest this mood?
          • The artist has not given this painting a title.  Study the work.  What title would you give it?  Why?  Then write a 5 paragraph explanatory essay in which you state this title and give three reasons for your choice. (45 Minutes).
          • Pair/Share:  Read each other's essays.  Proofread each others essays and make corrections.
          • Switch your essays with another group.  Discuss the various titiles.  Which are the most suitable? Why?  

HOME LEARNNING
Week of 9/19
                                Title:  Spellbinder: The Life of Harry Houdini - p. 804
                                          
and Houdini: The Great Escape - p. 812

                                            
Essential Question:  Can You Believe Your Eyes?

9/19
Grade 6: Gifted


Instructional Focus:
Author's purpose
(Based on the Baseline Data) : Informational Text

Pacing Guide Objectives
LA.6.1.7.3 - The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level text through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details.
LA.6.2.2.2 - The student will use information from the text to answer questions related to the main idea or relevant details, maintaining chronological or logical order.
    • Students will answer the questions found in the margins

LA.6.1.7.7 - The student will compare and contrast elements in multiple texts.
    • This will be done on 9/27

LA.6.3.1.2 - The student will pre-write by making a plan for writing that prioritizes ideas, addresses purpose, audience, main idea, and logical sequence.
LA.6.3.2.2 - The student will draft writing by organizing information into a logical sequence and combining or deleting sentences to enhance clarity.
    • Students will write a 5 paragraph essay in which they title an untitled painting giving 3 reasons with supporting details for their choice.

AGENDA:
1. Do Now-Journal: Have you ever watched a magician do tricks?  If so, what amazed you?  If not, what type of magic tricks are you aware of?
  2. Main Idea Tutorial – Handout
      a. Go over  
      b. Take Notes
  3. Read 804-808 :
      a. Determine Implied Main Idea using strategies from the handout
      b. Look at the topic and the details
  4.  END LESSON: What did you learn about Houdini?

EXTRA CREDIT HOME LEARNING:  Use the on-line textbook and answer all of the questions on page 209


9/21 – Sub Plans – Main Idea and Details



                                   Title:  Spellbinder: The Life of Harry Houdini - p. 804
                                            and Houdini: The Great Escape - p. 812

                                       Essential Question:  Can You Believe Your Eyes?


9/20 and 9/22
Grade 6: Advanced


Instructional Focus: Informational Text (Based on the Baseline Data)
Pacing Guide Objectives
LA.6.1.7.3 -
The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level text through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details.
LA.6.2.2.2 - The student will use information from the text to answer questions related to the main idea or relevant details, maintaining chronological or logical order.
  • Students will answer the questions found in the margins

LA.6.1.7.7 - The student will compare and contrast elements in multiple texts.
  • This will be done on 9/26

LA.6.3.1.2
- The student will pre-write by making a plan for writing that prioritizes ideas, addresses purpose, audience, main idea, and logical sequence.
LA.6.3.2.2 - The student will draft writing by organizing information into a logical sequence and combining or deleting sentences to enhance clarity.
  • Students will write a 5 paragraph essay in which they title an untitled painting giving 3 reasons with supporting details for their choice.

AGENDA:
  1. Do Now-Journal:  Explain an illusion that seemed to be real.
  2. Read 804-808 :
      a. Determine Implied Main Idea using strategies from the handout
      b. Look at the topic and the details
ALTERNATE AGENDA:
  1. Do Now-Journal:  Explain an illusion that seemed to be real.
  2. Read 804-808: Write the questions and the answers for all the questions found in the margins of these pages.

END LESSON: What did you learn about Houdini?

EXTRA CREDIT HOME LEARNING:  Use the on-line textbook and answer all of the questions on page 809


Sub Plans - Main Idea



                                             
Title:  Spellbinder: The Life of Harry Houdini - p. 804
                                      and Houdini: The Great Escape - p. 812

                                                                 

                                              ESSENTIAL QUESTION:  How do you unlock a mystery?
9/23
Grade 6: Gifted
Instructional Focus: Informational Text (Based on the Baseline Data)
Do Now/Journal -
How do you unlock a mystery? (812)
Pacing Guide Objectives
LA.6.2.2.2 - The student will use information from the text to answer questions related to the main idea or relevant details, maintaining chronological or logical order.
  • Students will answer the questions D, E, and F found in the margins (807-808)

LA.6.1.6.3 -
The student will use context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.
  • Students will write the answers only for page 810  (Peer Grade)

LA.6.3.1.2 -
The student will pre-write by making a plan for writing that prioritizes ideas, addresses purpose, audience, main idea, and logical sequence.
LA.6.3.2.2 - The student will draft writing by organizing information into a logical sequence and combining or deleting sentences to enhance clarity.

  • Students will respond to the Writing Prompt on page 811 and write a 1 paragraph flyer to persuade people to attend one of Houdini’s illusions.
  • Correct capitalization counts

Grading Criteria:  
  • The student will use persuasive language – use words that appeal to the reader’s emotions or pique their curiosity
  • The student will include details about Houdini’s act as described in the selection
Week of 9/19
Week of 9/26
Sub Plans 9/26

                            Title: “Dog of Pompeii”, Louis Untermeyer,  p. 314
                             & from “In Search of Pompeii”, Giovanni Caselli &                                                           “Italians Trying to Prevent a Modern Pompeii”, Ellen Hale

                   ESSENTIAL QUESTION;  What would you risk for someone else?

9/28
6th Grade Advanced
AOI: HSE

Instructional Focus: Author's Purpose
Baseline Data:  Informational Text/Research Process

PURPOSE - Students will synthesize information and evaluate historical fiction by comparing the events in the story to facts they've learned.                    

AGENDA (Based on Pacing Guide)
1.  Do Now/Journal:  Copy: LA.6.1.6.7 – The student will identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words. Then, write the correct answers for 1-5 (Vocabulary Strategy: The Latin Root "rupt") Page 326
2.  Read "Dog of Pompeii"
3.  LA.6.1.7.3 - The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level text through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details.
     * Skill:  Do B. - Extended Response: Draw Conclusions on Page 327 -- Make sure you follow the guideline given in "Self Check"
     LA.6.2.2.3 – The student will organize information to show understanding (i.e., representing main ideas within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting).
     *  Skill:  Students will synthesize information about Pompeii and Mount Vesuvius.  They will put together facts, details and ideas from different sources.  (Page 328)

End Lesson/Journal:  What would you risk for someone else?