In Class Objectives in Focus:
The student uses a variety of strategies to
-- analyze words and text
-- draw conclusions
-- locate information in text
-- analyze literature
-- to take notes to prepare for a quiz
Materials:
Chalk Board and chalk
Notebook, paper, pen or pencil
Handouts:  The Portfolio Guideline
Book: 
Out of the Dust, by Karen Hesse
Video: 
Adventures of the Old West - Pioneers and the Promised Land
READ A BOOK!
Project: A Writing Portfolio is due April 6th, 2005.  It is worth 6 grades.  Students need to bring to class a duotang or 3-prong-folder.  Note:  Most students have already written first drafts of the required criteria.  Students will recieve The Writing Portfolio Guideline today.  The student can earn an extra-credit "A" only if they have a parent or guardian read the guideline and sign the bottom portion of the guideline and turn this portion in this Thursday or Friday. They will keep the guideline and sign a sheet, after I see the signature for the extra credit grade, since the guideline is printed front and back of 1 sheet of paper.
Purpose: Success in high school magnet programs and in the real world requires the ability to communicate ideas and to be creative and critical thinkers.  Therefore, it is important for gifted students to complete The Writing Portfolio to showcase their ability to communicate ideas, to be creative, and to make a convincing case for their own interpretations of issues and problems.  The Writing Portfolio requires students to select the best work they have completed.  In addition, it asks for a reflective essay, which will be a Letter to the Reader,  in which students will both assess the products in their portfolio and reflect on the development of their writing skills. 
Today's Activities:
1.  Review The Writing Portfolio Guidelines.  Emphasize how students can earn an extra-credit "A" for the 3rd grading period.
2,  Students lead a question and answer discussion covering Teacher-Like Questions they composed and answered for the last reading of Out of the Dust.
3.  Read aloud in class, Out of the Dust.  Try to finish book.
     -- have students visualize a picture in their minds to answer the following:
        a.  When I read this, I imagine that...
        b.  As I read, in my mind I see ...
     -- Clarify stems:
        a.  I don't really understand ...
        b.  A question I have is ...
        c.  A question  I'd like answered by the author is ...
        d.  One word/phrase I do not understand is...
4.  Sections 5 and 6 will watch the video:
Adventures of the Old West - Pioneers and the Promised LandThey will have to take notes for an open notebook quiz on Friday.
For the fourth Grading Period, Students must read books at or above their grade level:
6th graders must read books at 850 or higher
7th graders must read books at 900 or higher
8th graders must read books at 975 or higher
Click on the boy reading and check the Lexile Level of a book you want to read.
This will take you to the Lexile Framework for Reading web site.  Click on families, then type in the title of your book, and author's last name in the box for a Quick Book Search.  If the book is listed, it will give the lexile level of the book.
Lesson:  Writing Portfolio Project
Click on the sun to get to Just Read, Florida!
Instructional Focus:  Words and Phrases
Metaphor --
A metaphor is the comparison of two unrelated nouns and giving them a quality  in common.  A metahor does not use the words, like or as, that a simile uses.

Areas of Interaction:
A. Homo Faber (HF) -- The student will create and illustrate a metaphor on his/her file folder.
II. Composition. 1.  The student engages in both self-initiated and teacher directed writing for a variety of purposes.  (LA.B.1.3.1) (LA.B.1.3.2) LA.B.2.3.1) (LA.B.2.3.3)

B.  Approaches to Learning (ATL)
1.  Vocabulary
Expands knowledge of grade-appropriate vocabulary in reading, writing, and speaking.
(lA.A.1.3.3) (LA.C.3.3.3)

2.  Organizing and presenting work
IV. Listening/Speaking/Viewing
1.  Follows verbal directions (LVS.1)
2.  The student presents his/her metaphor-file-older to their classmates and teacher.

                                             
NOTE:  CRISS strategies will be applied
OPENING LESSON:  On Monday through Wednesday, students will create a metaphor to describe who they are by comparing themselves to a plant, thing. idea, or an animal.  The metaphor will include 3 adjectives to explain the metaphor statement.  Students  will write and illustrate their chosen  metaphors  on their  file folders, and will  present them in class.
Home Learning Due on 8/16:
STUDENTS WHO ARE  UNABLE TO COMPLETE THEIR METAPHOR-FILE-FOLDERS WILL COMPLETE THEM FOR HOME LEARNING.

Home Learning Due on 8/17 & 8/18: EACH STUDENT WILL RESEARCH ON THE INTERNET THE SYMBOLISM OF THE ANIMAL, PLANT OR THING OF COMPARISON  IN THEIR METAPHOR TO WRITE A FREE VERSE POEM.   INSTEAD, STUDENTS MAY CHOOSE TO WRITE A POEM ABOUT A CONCEPT FOUND IN THEIR ADJECTIVES, FOR EXAMPLE, JOYFUL - JOY, BEAUTIFUL - BEAUTY, HOPEFUL - HOPE, STRONG - STRENGTH, OR FAST - SPEED.
                  Study Help
1.  Look up Elements of a Story and Literary Devices On-Line by clicking onto the following:
Elements of a Story - Novel & Short Story
Literary Devices
Classical Literary Terms
                           Unit Objectives:
Formulates questions that clarify meaning and participates in class and group discussions that include higher-level thinking, such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation and alternates between the roles of contributor and leader in a group discussion.  (LA.C.1.3.4) (LA.C.3.3.2) (LA.C.3.3.3) (LVS.2) (LVS.19)
LA.A.2.3.1 -- the student appreciates literature
LA.A.1.3.5 -- the student understands the theme of the story
Essential Questions:

Instructional Focus:  How does knowledge of the Elements of a Story help you understand a work of fiction.

7th Grade Reading:  Why is an individual's identity important?
8th Grade reading:   Why are rules important in a society?
Areas of Interaction:
Approaches to Learning: 
Vocabulary
Notetaking -- to prepare for a pop quiz
Apply Reading Strategies

Homo Faber
                                 Activities:
20 Minutes -- Instructional Focus:  Words and Phrases -- Elements of a Story
Students will use their textbooks to look at context clues to find definitions of plot, central conflict, plot complications, exposition, rising action, climax, denouement, character, main character, minor characters, character traits, character motives, setting, and theme.  Students will write these definitions in the note section of their notebooks.  Note:  Students will use the class period to finish copying notes from the
McDougal Littell: The Language of Literature on the Elements of a Story.

30 Minutes of Sustained Reading:
Students will read aloud in class.
7th grade: 
The Light in the Forest, by Conrad Richter
8th Grade:
Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
While reading students will summarize particular passages for better understanding.
For Light in the Forest, students will learn about the "yellow vomit"
For Lord of the Flies, students will learn what a conch is through hands on appreciation.
At the end of reading, students will answer the essential questions on their grade-level reading.
7th Grade Students in 4th period will copy down questions from the overhead projector - (What is in a Name and questions regarding how it would feel to learn that the parents you know are not really your parents or how it would feel to be taken away from one's family.)   These questions are to be completed for homework.
20 Minutes: Presentation of Metaphor Folders.
Lesson Plans for Elements of a Story
Home Learning:
1.  Metaphor/Adjective Poem is due.
2.  4th Period (7th Grade):  Questions from the overhead --
What Is in a Name are due 8/21.
Time to have your supplies for Language Arts
Instructional Focus:  Words and Phrases -- Elements of a Story
20 Minutes: Students will take notes on the Elements of a Story
15 Minutes: Students will answer the grade appropriate Essential question on reading, which is lised above.
Make sure you come to class on August 20th and August 21st with the required supplies!  Refer to my first and second pages of my web site for the list of supplies, notebook divisions, pop quizzes, tests and study sites.
Lesson Plan
Students may read books 100 lexile points below or above their grade level average:
7th graders:   Books at 850L - 975L
8th graders:   Books at 900L - 1025L
Lesson Objective:  Multisyllable Words
The student expands knowledge of grade-appropriate vocabulary in reading, writing, and speaking.  (lA.A.1.3.3) (LA.C.3.3.3)


Light in the Forest, by Conrad Richter
Home Learning:
Due:  8/21 -- Questions from What's in a Name for 4th Period (7th Grade Gifted)
Due:  8/23 -- Vocabulary-- know the definitions and how to spell each word. 

Instructional Focus:  Words and Phrases:  Structural Analysis of Words
To figure out the meaning of  multisyllable words, structural analysis is a good strategy.  When you come across an unfamiliar word with many syllables, break it down.  Remove the first syllable, the prefix.  Then, remove the last syllable, the suffix.  Look at the root, base or combining forms of  the word to figure out the meaning of any parts of the word.  After breaking the word apart and figuring out the meanings of each component, put the word back together again and check to see if the meaning you came up with fits in the context of  the sentence and paragraph.  Click on "Understanding Structural Patterns of Root Words Improves Reading."
20 Minute Activities:
1.  Students will read the  Handout on "Affixes."
2.  Students will  apply structural analysis to figure out the meaning of new words during the Sustained 30 Minutes of Reading.

30 Minutes of Sustained Reading:

7th Grade Students will read aloud
The Light in the Forest, and
8th Grade Studnts will read aloud
Lord of the Flies.
Additional Activities: 
1.  Working in pairs, students will review the passages just read and work together using structual analysis to figure out the meaning of new words.  The words they find will be written dow in their Class Notes section of their notebooks.
2.  Vocabulary on the Board:  Students will copy down the words.  In class, students will apply structural analysis and then look up the meaning of each word.  This assignment will be completed for Home Learning.
4.  Students will write in their journals and answer the folllowing questions:,"What I learned today in Language Arts," and "How can I use structural analysis of words in my daily life?"
Areas of Interaction:
Approaches to Learning = Vocabulary
Essential Question:
How would structural analysis of words help me in my daily life
?
Vocabulary and Spelling Words
7th Grade
8th Grade
1.    Pockhapockink
2.    redoubts
3.    aversion
4.    loathing
5.    rustling
6.    affronted
7.    colonel
8.    fetching
9.    ungratefulness
10.  calico
11.  varmint
12.  Waldhonig
13.  doughtier
14.  abandonment
15.  bustle
16.  forsaken
17.  haltered
18.  bandy-legged
19.  strouding


1.    clambering
2.    crook (of the knee)
3.    (to be) offhand
4.    altered
5.    apparently
6.    lugged
7.    reluctantly
8.    apprehension
9.    granite
10.  efflorescence
11.  scurried
12.  plunged
13.  breakers
14.  enveloped
15.  enmity
16.  interposed
17.  jutting
18.  incredulous
19.  descent (of the party)
20.  pendulum
21.  indignation
22.  humped (near) v.
23.  gully
24.  proffer
25.  immured
26.  bastion

The Light in the Forest, by Conrad Richter
The Lord of the Flies, William Golding
For Home Learning help to look up these words and their etymology, click on the sun.
What Is in a Name?

Questions of Concern
7th grade:  Guiding Question for The Light in the Forest:
1.  What is your full name?
2.  Where did your surname, or last name, come from?
3.  Who named you and why?
4.  What does your fiirst name mean?  What do your other names symbolize?  What is your own interpretation of your name?  What do others think about your name?
5.  You have already chosen a metaphor and three adjectives to describe who you are.  What other adjectives, adverbs or verbs would you use to describe your name?
6.  Do you have any nicknames?  Explain how you got your nickname/s.
7.  Do you like your name.  Does it fit you?  Would you choose another name?  Why or why not?
8.  How would you feel if you leaned that you are adopted or not your parents' child?
9.  How would you feel if you were taken away from the only parents you have ever known?
10.  What would you do if you knew you would be permanently taken away from your home?

Classics for Middle School
For a List of Books to Read for Middle School Students, click on the sun.
Click on the sun to reach the Lexile Framework for Reading Home Page.  At this site you may find the lexile level of a book you are reading or want to read.  Search through the heading, Families.
Lesson Plan
Home Learning:
Competency:
Materials:
Students will look up the etymology of each word in their vocabulary list.  Click on "Vocabulary"  to see the list of words for Grade 7 and Grade 8.
Periods 1, 3 and 5 due:  8/28/06
Periods 2, 4 and 6 due:  8/25/06
Activities:
The student will:
1  Take a spelling Test and peer grade it in class.
2.  Take an open notebook quiz, using the North Dade Middle School Planner, or agenda, their notes on metaphor, Elements of a Story, structural analysis of a word, and their home learning - vocabulary words defined; and the novel for their grade level.
3.  7th Grade:  Once the student has completed taing the pop quiz, he/she is to read chapter 4 of
The Light in the Forest.  Students are to read silently.
4.  8th Grade:  After the student has finished the exam, he/she is to finish reading chapter 1 of
Lord of the Flies.  Students are to read silently.
Dry Board and marker
Teacher-made exams.
Novels:
The Light in the Forest, by Conrad Richter
             Lord of the Flies
, William Golding.
Student's school supplies, agenda, notes and home learning.
Page 2 for Reference and Research
Click on the sun forAdditional Reading List
The student will apply notetaking skills to take a pop quiz for which they may use their notes.  Students will also apply study skills for doing well on the spelling portion of the quiz.  By having an organized notebook, with their vocabulary words in the vocabulary section of their notebook, the student will prove to have good organizational skills and study habits by making an "A" or a "B" on this quiz.
The book the 7th Grade Students are reading in class.
The theme for the 7th Grade is:  We appreciate cultures.  This book of historical fiction will give students an insight of culture of the Lenni Lenape - the Delaware Tribe of Indians.  Click on
Delaware to go to the Delaware Tribe Home Page. 
Areas of Interaction:
Approaches to Learning:
Study and organizational skills
Vocabulary
Notetaking skills
Assessment for Spelling
-0 to -1   = A
        -2   = B
        -3   = C
        -4   = D
        -5+ = F
Assessment for the Open Notebook Quiz
90 to 100   = A
80 to 89     = B
70 to 79     = C
60 to 69     = D
  0 to 59     = F
For a List of Books to Read for Middle School Students, click on the sun.
Click on the sun forAdditional Reading List
Want to Find Out What to Read?
Click on the Newsboy to see book reviews and lists for teen favorites right here at the Miami-Dade Public Library System.
Want to Jump to a Higher Reading Level for Accelerated Reader?
Then, Click on the Book Above and Look at the List From Sebring Middle School, in Florida.
Read a Book of Fiction -
Character Traits Poster is Due:
2/22 & 2/24
Click on the mouse to get an FCAT sample test.  Then, select a grade-level Sample FCAT Test for Reading.  Print the test and underline all of the answers in the reading passages.  Make sure you put the test number above the underlined passages.  Afterwards check your answers using the Answer Key.  Turn the printed test with the answers underlined and numbered within the reading passages for extra credit.  (Worth 3 grades.)
Study for FCAT Reading And Earn Extra Credit
Lesson Plans
Approaches to Learning:  Reading to Comprehend Poetry
Instructional Focus:  Determining Figurative Language
Essential Question: 
How does FCAT prepare you for the real world?
8th Grade: STUDENTS WILL READ &  ANALYZE POEMS AND TAKE NOTES ON POETRY :
"Legacies" and "Choices," by Niki Giovanni, pages 418-420 in McDougal Littell: THE LANGUAGE OF LITERATURE and answer FCAT questions in the workbook.
Students will also read and analyze "Moterher to Son," by Langston Hughes, page 193
"A Loaf of Poetry," by Naoshi Koriyama, page 217
"Simile: Willow and Ginkgo," by Eve Merriam, page 216
Students will take notes on pages 187 through 190 on Poetry

7th Grade: STUDENTS WILL READ &  ANALYZE POEMS AND TAKE NOTES ON POETRY :
"The Highwayman," by Alfred Noyes, pages 565-571, in McDougal Littell: THE LANGUAGE OF LITERATURE and answer FCAT questions in the workbook. --  to understand who the highwaymen were, students will read "Build Background" on page 564 in the textbook.
"Ode to an Artichoke," by Pablo Neruda, pages 375-379.  Students will read "Build Background" and "Connect To Your Life" on page 375 to understand what an artichoke is.  Then, students will read the poem and answer questions on page 379. 


FOR ALL CLASSES:
ALL POETRY WIL BE READ ALOUD AT LEAST TWICE.
ALL QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WILL BE REVIEWED IN CLASS


THERE WILL BE A TEST ON "THE MEDICINE BAG," BY VIRGINIA DRIVING HAWK SNEVE, AND THE POETRY ABOVE FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL.
Essential Question: 
How  can learning the nicknames of the 50 states be useful to you?
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE MIDDLE YEARS PROGRAMME
APPROACHES TO LEARNING:  lANGUAGE ARTS --
THE STUDENT USES DETAILS TO DETERMINE FACTS.
INTERDISCIPLINARY LESSON:  SOCIAL STUDIES AND lANGUAGE ARTS -- FIRST, THE STUDENT WRITES THE 50 STATES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER AND EACH  STATE'S NICKNAMES, USING CLUES GIVEN IN THE HANDOUT.  SECOND, THE STUDENT WRITES A POEM USING FIVE (5) OF THE NICKNAMES AND CORRESPONDING STATES
On Wednesday, Students will present their
Character Traits Posters
.