Week of Oct. 23rd - 27th
On October 23rd and 24th, all students will take the First FCAT Quarterly Reading Assessment Test, which is a 45-minute-timed test.
Home Learning Due November 13th & 14th
7th Graders:  Creative Project for Gifted: 
A Native American Tribe -- Each student will draw a name of a Native American Tribe to research.
(Parents and Guardians, please see that your 7th grader follows the suggested completion dates for each topic on the guideline, so that there isn't any procrastination for last minute all nighters.) 
            
8th Graders:  My Autobiographical  Scrapbook
(Parents and Guardians, please help students work on their family tree.)

Extra Credit -- Parental Involvement:  (Two Grades) Students who bring in the bottom portion of the second page to their project guideline, signed by a parent or guardian will earn two "A's." 
Click on Osceola, above, to learn  about the story of the great Seminole Indian Leader.
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, by Washington Irving
Eighth grade students will read The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, and write down words and phrases
they do not know in their Vocabulary Section of their 3-ring binders.  After reading certain certain passages of this story, they will look up the definitions of these words and phrases.
"The Girl Who Hunted Rabbits"
A Zuni Indian Legend
Zuni Indian Girl
To read more Zuni Indian Legends, click onto the Zuni girl portrait, above.
7th Grade students will first write down the definition of a legend and all of the definitions of the vocabulary words in bold before reading "The Girl Who Hunted Rabbits."  Afterwards, they will answer the Interpreting, Applying, Analyzing Literature, Critical Thinking and Reading, and Understanding Language questions on page 641 of the Prentice Hall Literature (Silver Ed.) book. 
Essential Question: How do American legends and myths give you clues to what American  life and culture was like at the time these stories were told in various American communities and Native American tribes?
Instructional Focus:
Words and Phrases
Goal:  INTERCULTURAL AWARENESS To develop in students respect for others and an appreciation of similarities and differences and to develop an awareness of their own place in the world.
Areas of Interaction:
1.  Approaches to Learning: Vocabulary, reading for different purposes, research, organizing and presenting work
2.  Homo faber, environment, health and social education
To read more about Sleepy Hollow, understand the theme, and to read the actual legend On-line, click onto the picture above.
Note: 
Students will do research on their projects at the Media Center on 10/26 & 10/27.
Lesson Plans for the Week of Oct. 30th - Nov. 3rd
              Home Learning Due November 13th & 14th
7th Graders:  Creative Project for Gifted:  A Native American Tribe
(Parents and Guardians, please see that your 7th grader follows the suggested completion dates for each topic on the guideline, so that there isn't any procrastination for last minute all nighters.) 
            
8th Graders:  My Autobiographical  Scrapbook
(Parents and Guardians, please help students work on their family tree.)


Extra Credit -- Parental Involvement:  (Two Grades) Students who bring to the next class the bottom portion of the second page to their project guideline, signed by a parent or guardian. will earn two "A's." 
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, by Washington Irving
Eighth grade students will finish reading The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, and write down words and phrases they do not know in their Vocabulary Section of their 3-ring binders.  After reading, they will look up the definitions of these words and phrases.
"The Girl Who Hunted Rabbits"
A Zuni Indian Legend
To read more Zuni Indian Legends, click onto the Zuni Indian Girl portrait..
7th Grade students will:
1.   Finish reading "The Girl Who Hunted Rabbits."  and answer the I
nterpreting, Applying, Analyzing Literature, Critical Thinking and Reading, and Understanding Language questions on page 641 of the Prentice Hall Literature (Silver Ed.) book.


Essential Question: How do American legends and myths give you clues to what American  life and culture was like at the time these stories were told in various American communities and Native American tribes?
Instructional Focus:
Author's Purpose
Words and Phrases
FCAT Writing+ (Understanding Voice)
Goal:  INTERCULTURAL AWARENESS To develop in students respect for others and an appreciation of similarities and differences and to develop an awareness of their own place in the world.
To read more about Sleepy Hollow, understand the theme, and to read the actual legend On-line, click onto the picture.
                                             Note: 
Students began research on their projects at the Media Center on 10/26 & 10/27.
On Monday and Tuesday - 10/30 - 10/31
2.  Copy down the definition of a myth and all of the vocabulary in bold on pages 626 - 629 in Prentice Hall Literature (Silver Ed.) book and then read "The Origin of Fire."  Afterwards, they are to answer all of the questions on 629.  All work must be turned in.
To read a Nez Perce legend, click onto the Nez Perce Child, above.
ALL Students will:
Revise their essays:
How To Be Cyber Savvy
(Dear Sub, these essays are in a folder on top of my desk, on the left side.  Pass them out to students and then show them the
transparency/ies -- on
Sentence Fluency, which is one of the photocopied transparencies in one of the two transparency boxes on my desk.) 
  Afterwards, have students rewrite their essays, improving their sentence fluency and mistakes previously found when peers proof-read the essays. 

Thursday and Friday
8th grade students should have finished reading The Legend of  Sleepy Hollow and completed defining  words -- adding these to their vocabulary section of their notebooks.
8th Grade: 
Instructional Focus:
Elements of Plot
Author's Purpose
Author's Viewpoint
Main Idea - Theme
After reading Rip Van Winkle, (books are under the desks), 8th grade students are to answer the following questions and turn them in:
1.  What is the main theme for this legend?  Explain fully.  Are there any other themes?
2.   Explain in detail what the author's purpose was for writng Rip Van Winkle. 
3.  What viewpoint was this legend written in?
4.  How did life in the village change in the 20 years from the time Rip Van Winkle fell asleep to the time he woke up?  Explain in detail.
5.  What was the role of women in this time period? And men?  What was domestic life like?
6.  How and when did Rip Van Winkle fall asleep? And who is all around him when he does so?
7.  At the story's end, Rip has found his profession, what is it?
8.  Turning back to
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, explain what the stated moral at the end of the story means.
9.  What was Irving's view of the professional politician?
10. What were the character traits of Ichabod Crane?  What do these traits infer about his social identity?
11. How does his antagonist, Brom Van Brunt, contrast with Ichabod in the contest for Katrina Von Tassel?
Rip Van Winkle ewaking up.
Lesson Plans for Nov. 6th  & Nov. 9th
2007
7th Grade Instructional Focus:
Author's Purpose
7th grades students should have fininshed all of the assignments for "The Girl Who Hunted Rabbits"   
Essential Question  for 7th Graders: 
What can we learn about Native Americans by reading their myths and legends?
Home Learning:  Projects are due Nov. 13th and 14th
ALL STUDENTS (Click Above onto Projects )
On my paternal side, we can trace our ancestry to Peter Stuyvesant, the last Dutch Director-General of the colony of New Amsterdam (New York) from 1647-1664.  Click onto Peter Stuyvesant to learn about who he was. 
On my maternal side, we can trace our family tree back to the House of Yarborough, in England -- the "Yarbro" family is the eleventh oldest family in England.   Click onto the Family Coat of Arms to learn about the Yarbros, or Yarboroughs.
   Motto: 
The palm is not obtained without toil.
On my maternal side, my great, great grandmother  was a full-blooded Cherokee Indian.  My great grandmother, who raised my mother, never explained why she had the most beautiful golden skin.  She did not want anyone to know she was part Cherokee, she knew as a child how dangerous this could be when so many of her ancestors were forced off their land by Andrew Jackson in 1838, so new white settlers could have their land.  To learn more about this shameful event, known as "The Trail of Tears," when the Cherokee, Choctaw, Seminole, Chickasaw and Muscogee Creek were forced to cross the country and so many of their citizens died along the way, click onto the Trail of Tears poster .  To learn about the Cherokee Indian Tribe, click on the painting
"Pride of the Cherokees, Sharon Evans Art
Review for 7th Graders:
1.  Answers to the questions at the end of this story  will be given. 

2.
Discussion:  What are legends?

3. 
Journal --  Write the  Essential Questions and answer it.
*  What elements of this legend is based on fact?  (What if the Zuni maiden had actually come back  with more rabbits than anyone else had ever brought back to the village?  Since the men were the hunters and not the women, ow would this event have been explained?)
*  Go through the legend and find passages that tell us about Zuni life:
  - How did they live?
  - What type of clothing did they wear?
  - What were their beliefs?
  - What type of food did they eat?
  - How did they treat their elders?

*  Students will write about an unusual phenomenon and explain how it happened.

4.  Discussion:  What is inference?  When do you have to infer?



Imagine that something happens one day that has never happened before and there is no apparent explanation for it.  Perhaps dogs begin to speak, or it truly rains cats and dogs, or a child grows into an adult over night.  You choose the phenomenon and write to explain it.
Click onto "Raining Cats and Dogs," Art by Gayle Pitt
7th Grade Instructional Focus:
Author's Purpose
Words and Phrases
Understanding an Expository Essay
7th grade students should have fininshed the assignments for "The Girl Who Hunted Rabbits" and "The Origin of Fire."   They are to read page 456 first.  Then they are to do the Writing assignment on this page and write down all of the vocabulary words and their definitions in their Vocabulary section of their notebooks.  Afterwards, have students read "The Indian All Around Us" aloud -- pages 457 - 460 in the Prentice Hall Literature (Silver Ed.) book.  When finished, students need to add all of the bold vocabulary words and definitions to their list found on these pages plus those  words found in the text.  Afterwards, have students answer all the questions and do all of the assignments on page 463, (Skip writing the expository essay.)  Turn the work in
Essential Question: Considering the way Indians lived and the help they gave some American settlers, what kinds of words would you expect to have come into common English use from Native American languages?