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UNIT PLANNING IN THE IB-MYP THROUGH INQUIRY
Unit title: Commonalities and Differences in Culture: In India and Your Culture
Mrs. Carlson-Yellen
Language Arts for Gifted
6th Grade
6 to 7 Weeks
             Area of Interaction Focus:
Community and Service:  Students will learn how their cultural communities consisting of home, school, family, city and country are different and/or similar to the cultural communities of the fictional character, Koly, in India.
Finding the Big Idea (Significant Concept): From reading Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan, students will see that even though there are many differences between their culture and the culture of India there are basic human commonalities that are the same, such as wanting to have a happy and successful life.
                    Significant Concept:
Over the years I want my students to retain the concept that even though cultures in different societies or communities are different, there are human commonalities among the many peoples of the world.
Unit Question:
What commonalities may exist across cultures as well as differences among them?
FROM ASSESSMENT TO TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES THROUGH INQUIRY
Assessment Reflections:
*The exemplars that students will see so that they understand what is required are:
1.  Students will read in class pages R45 - R48 of the
Writing Handbook in McDougal Littell's The Language of Literature
*  to understand that expository, or explanatory writing, informs and explains.
*  to be able to write a Compare and Contrast Essay
*  to refer to these reference pages in order to set up their pattern of organization when writing their expository essay

2.  Students will read R54 and R55  in the same textbook
*  to understand how to document their sources for in-text parenthetical documentation and for their Works Cited List.

3.  Students will listen to different paragraphs from students' Compare and Contrast Essays as they are orally presented by their classmates in front of the class to hear what they have to say about the similarities and differences of their own culture and that of Koly's cultural experiences in India, as understood from reading
Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan.

4.  While reading
Homeless Bird aloud in class, we will discuss how the author presents what the cultural expectations are for Koly as a 13-year-old girl in India and the trials and tribulations she must go through as a widow in India.

5.  Students will read about the social issue of dowry in India and Pakistan.  (Note: Students will understand that Pakistan was once part of India and did not become the country it is today until 1956.)  Students will be given a handout on the problem of dowry in India and will also investigate this social issue when we have the portable computer lab. They will see that there are citizens in both India and Pakistan that feel this custom is wrong, because in certain cases, it leads to bride burning in rural areas of both countries.

6.  Students will use the computer lab to research and discuss other issues and topics covered in
Homeless Bird, such as the homeless widows of Vrindavan (also in a handout), embroidery, the sacred Ganges River, arranged marriages, and rites and customs of marriages and funerals, and India's Nobel Prize winning poet, Tagore.

7.  Students will read the poem, by Tagore, on which Gloria Whelan based the title of this book.
*Students will have the opportunity to answer the unit question during the unit, using what they have learned, by doing the following:
1.  Write about:
*  Core values
*  Girls - what gifts would they give to their future husbands if dowry existed in the United States?
*  Boys - what gifts would they expect to receive from their future brides if dowry existed in the U.S.?
*  What do they think about the practice of dowry in India?
*  What would they do if their parents did not approve of their fiance?
*  The similarities and differences between their culture and India's culture.

2.  Discuss in class:
*  The pros and cons about arranged marriages.
*  Wedding customs in India and the United States
*  Education:  The power of knowing how to read.
*  Funeral customs and practices in India and the United States
*  Homelessness
*  Widows in India
*  Who was Tagore?
*  Forms of transportation in India and the U.S. 
*  The importance of being able to support oneself.

3.  Bring in:
*  Samples of clothing, or home decor, that is embroidered
*  Student drawn pictures of wedding attire for an Indian bride.


 
*Considerations given for the nature of the assessment:
1.  Students will look at the affects of dowry in India and Pakistan..  Students will see that the government has passed laws against the practice of dowry, but the tradition is still very much a custom of India and Pakistan.  1 Block

2.  Students will write an essay about dowry in India.  Home Learning.

3.  Students will read
Homeless Bird aloud in class so that all students will know what is going on in the story.  5 Weeks

4.  Open-notes pop quizzes, and two tests, including an end of the novel unit test, will be given for reading comprehension of
Homeless Bird.  

5.  For the essay -- What commonalities may exist across cultures as well as differences among them?  Students will be given guidance for comparing and contrasting cultural similarities and differences between the United States and India.   Using the computer and the television set, the teacher will show pictures of the Ganges River, Varanasi and Vrindavan, bridal attire and an Indian wedding, and a rickshaw.  The teacher will also give students an example of a compare and contrast essay.  The students will first write a compare and contrast essay on the culture of India and the U.S.. The purpose of this writing exercise  is for students to learn that they can write  a long essay to prepare them to write an
essay  of 500 to 1000 words. The students will then write the final essay, using their compare and contrast essay as reference for process writing. 
2 Block periods and 2 weeks (due to calendar school-wide  activities and 8th grade field trips.

6.  STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN ONE-ON-ONE  GUIDANCE TO IMPROVE THEIR WRITING FOR PROCESS WRITING.
1 Block

7.  Students will use the computer lab to:
*  read current news articles on the Internet about India.
*  read about cultural aspects of India.
2 Blocks

8.  Vocabulary Lessons:  Students will use dictionaries to look up new words and write the definitions down in their vocabulary section of their notebooks.  Students will take notes on the meanings of Indian words and phrases as they read.  Students will add defined new words to their list of words.
Five .5 hour lessons




*The level of Bloom's Taxonomy that the task asks the student to engage: 
1.  Synthesis:  The student will apply learned knowledge to create an original essay
2.  Evaluation:  The student will  interpret, compare and contrast, evaluate, and justify his or her own personal answer to the guiding question and relate it to what they learned about the culture in India through reading the literature as they compare and contrast it to their own culture.
*The task for this assessment will allow students to reach the highest descriptors. Students will create an original essay with no right or wrong answers, but they must justify their own personal interpretations with examples from the novel, Homeless Bird, and analyze the concepts of commonalities and differences between their culture and Koly's culture in India.
*What MYP task will be most appropriate and what will it look like?
Students respond to a range of texts, representing a range of contrasting viewpoints on a moral issue and social reality by writing an expository  essay of 500 to 1000 words.  Note:  Students will use MLA in-text citation.
*Which MYP objectives will be addressed and which criteria will you assess this task with?
#5  Students will begin to express an informed personal response to literary and non-literary texts and demonstrate the ability to approach age-appropriate works independently.  This task will be assessed with Criteria A and Criteria B.

*What state, provencial, district, or local standards/skills are to be addressed in the entire unit, not just the task?
LA.A.2.3.1  THE STUDENT DETERMINES THE MAIN IDEA OR ESSENTIAL MESSAGE IN A TEXT AND IDENTIFIES RELEVANT DETAILS AND FACTS AND PATTERNS OF ORGANIZATION.
LA.A.2.2.7  THE STUDENT RECOGNIZES THE USE OF COMPARISON AND CONTRAST IN A TEXT.
LA.B.2.3.1  THE STUDENT WRITES TEXT, NOTES, OUTLINES, COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS THAT DEMONSTRATE COMPREHENSION OF CONTENT AND EXPERIENCES FROM A VARIETY OF MEDIA
LA.C.3.3.1  THE STUDENT UNDERSTANDS HOW VOLUME, STRESS, PACING, AND PRONUNCIATION CAN POSITIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AFFECT AN ORAL PRESENTATION.
LA.C.1.3.`  THE STUDENT LISTENS AND USES INFORMATION GAINED FOR A VARIETY OF PURPOSES, SUCH AS GAINING INFORMATION FROM INTERVIEWS, FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS, AND PURSUING A PERSONAL INTEREST.
LA.E.1.3.1  THE STUDENT IDENTIFIES THE DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS OF CLASSIC LITERATURE, SUCH AS TIMELESSNESS, DEALING WITH UNIVERSAL THEMES, AND EXPERIENCES AND COMMUNICATING ACROSS CULTURES.
LA.E.1.3.5  THE STUDENT IDENTIFIES COMMON THEMES IN LITERATURE.
LA.E.1.3.2  THE STUDENT RECOGNIZES COMPLEX ELEMENTS OF PLOT, INCLUDING SETTIN, CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT, CONFLICTS, AND RESOLUTIONS.
LA..E.2.3.2  THE STUDENT RESPONDS TO A WORK OF LITERATURE BY INTERPRETING SELECTED PHRASES, SENTENCES, OR PASSAGES AND APPLYING THE INFORMATION TO PERSONAL LIFE.
LA.E.2.3.4  THE STUDENT KNOWS WAYS IN WHICH LITERATURE REFLECTS THE DIVERSE VOICES OF PEOPLE FROM VARIOUS BACKGROUNDS.
LA.B.1.3.2  THE STUDENT DRAFTS AND REVISES WRITING THAT IS PURPOSEFUL AND REFLECTS INSIGHT INTO THE WRITING SITUATION. 
*Approaches to Learning (Skills):
Every MYP unit will be based on approaches to learning which is an Area of Interaction.  However, the significant concept (listed above) dictates that we use one of the four other Areas of Interaction as the focus of the unit to make learning relevant for the situation. 
(For this unit, it will be Community and Service because students will compare their own culture to India's culture to see the commonalities and differences.)

*List the Approaches to Learning;
You will find these skills in the MYP Criteria for which you are using to assess your MYP task.  These Criteria will match up with the MYP objectives listed above.  Only list those skills that you are focusing on in the MYP task.

(For Criteria A and B)
1.  Reviewing new vocabulary using a dictionary
2.  Discussing different approaches
     *  how to write a thesis statement
     *  how to write a good paragraph
     *  how to write an 8 page essay
     *  how to write a compare and contrast essay
     *  the etiquette required for an oral presentation
3.  Expressing thoughts, feelings and opinions in writing
4.  How to write a compare and contrast essay
4.  Using electronic sources to locate information with the portable lab
5.  Using graphic organizers
     *  Venn Diagram for compare and contrast
     *  two-column notes for
In-text and Explanation (figurative language)
6.  Summarizing passages for comprehension
7.  Identifying key issues
8.  Fluency of ideas and elaboration for support
9.  Utilizing organizational skills

     
*Learning Experiences and Teaching Strategies:
(These are common agreements that all teachers teaching this unit will agree to.  Other strategies may be used individually by teachers in their own classrooms.) 
*How will you incorporate international mindedness throughout the unit?
     * 
By encouraging students to consider multiple perspectives through discussion and reading of fiction and non-fiction-texts
     *  Discuss that the tradition of arranged marriages are a part of many different cultures, (There have been instances in the Deep South of arranged and/or encouraged marriages for economic purposes (especially after the Civil War,)  In arranged marriages, the divorce rate is 50% lower than that of the United States where people choose who they wish to marry.   Parents want to make the best marriage arrangements for their daughters.
     *  People throughout the world want the basic necessities of shelter, food and clothing.
     *  Skills, such as hand embroidery, can be profitable in the United States and may have an element of elegance and prestige.  Some family heirlooms consist of embroidered linens. with the family crest.
     *  Reflect on the landmark event of having the first African American President-elect/President in relation to the changing racial perceptions of our national and worldwide community.  Discuss what causes prejudice. 
     *  Discuss how cultural beliefs may create prejudice among societies and communities. 
     *  Discuss what causes homelessness in our society.  Discuss prejudicial beliefs about the homeless people in the United States.
     *  Research how widows are treated worldwide.  

*How will the students learn the knowledge and practice the skills required? 
     *
Having an understanding the concept of "commonalities."
     *  Awareness of how a culture of a community affects the lives of its citizens.

     *
Students should have a thorough knowledge of the text and will receive diagnostic reading quizzes and tests, based on FCAT Benchmarks, to measure that knowledge. 
     *  Students should have an understanding of the general format of a compare and contrast essay.  They will acquire this by teacher model-guidance, writing several essays, peer-grading and editing of essays, and rewriting essays for Summative Assessment.

*How will we use formative assessment to give students feedback during the unit?  What are they?
    
*  Diagnostic reading quizzes will enable the teacher to tailor understanding of the text.
     *  There will be teacher/student interviews and conversations about the different parts of the writing process to gage understanding and development.

*What different teaching methodologies will we employ?  How are we differentiating teaching and learning for all?
   
*  Use of activities that require different intelligences (verbal, visual, interpersonal, and kinesthetic)
     *  Pair share
     *  Use of diagrams and visuals to help in developing an essay
     *  Use of shared inquiry


Ongoing Reflections and Evaluation
*Students and teachers:
    
* What did we find compelling?
          1.  Students learned that in some places in the world there are arranged marriages.
          2.  Students were concerned about the widows of India. 
               *  Relatives view widows as a burden financially. 
               *  Widows  believe that if they die in Vrindavan, they will not suffer the same fate in their next life.  
          3.  The fact that Koly could read.
               *  Generally, women in rural parts of India never learn to read.  
               *  That Koly's father-in-law taught her to read and introduced her to Tagore.
          4.  The River Ganges is considered a holy river, and people________________
               *  bathe in it.
               *  wash their clothes in it.
               *  believe that if you just touch it all of your sins will be washed away.
               *  believe that it can cure ilnesses and diseases.
               *  that the river has the ability to cleanse itself, and stays fresh for a long time.

    
* What learner-initiated inquiries arose during the learning? 
          1.  What kinds of wedding customs are there in different parts of the world?
          2.  How are the wedding customs in India different from ours?
          3.  How are the funeral customs in India different from ours?
          4.  Does the River Ganges cure diseases?
          5.  How are widows in the United States treated differently than in India?
          6.  What is a Rickshaw?  Do people still use them to travel in?
          7.  How many people can read in India? 
          8.  Who is Tagore?
          9.  Do any widows in India ever remarry?
        10.  What kind of animals live in India?
             
    
* From the evidence, what new student understandings may have been constructed?
          1.  From their 1,000-word essays, they were able to explain the differences and the similarities between their culture and Koly's in India. 
          2.  In addition, some were able to include other differences and similarities between their culture and those of the different countries they are learning about in other classes, such as Japan in their social studies/ humanities class.
       
   
    
* How did we deepen our understanding of the focus Areas of Interaction?
          1.  The Area of Interaction was Community and Service. 
               *  Students learned that their society and community is different from Koly's. but the basic needs are the same.
          2.  Students were able to live vicariously through Koly to understand what her life was like in India.
          3.  Students understood that people all over the world want to live a good life and marriage, and want to be loved.

   
* What opportunities exist for reflection - both within the unit and on our own learning?
          1.  What if I never saw my own family again?
          2.  What if I had to get married at the age of 13? 
          3.  What talents do I already have that would help me earn a living/
          4.  What if my parents did not approve of who I wanted to marry?
          5.  What if I did not know how to read? 
          6.  How would I go about teaching someone how to read?
          6.  Koly found solace and fortitude in the book of poems, by Tagore.  Is there a poem or a song that has special meaning to You?
 
    
* What, if any, extension activities arose?
          1.  Drawing a map of where Koly lived and the cities she traveled to.
          2.  Drawing of wedding attire for a couple in India.
          3.  Understanding where the title of the book came from by looking at some of Tagore's poems.
          4.  Sharing embroidered items.


* Collaboration: 
     Ms. de Armendi taught a unit on what makes a society.   Since her country is Japan, she taught students what the customs and traditions are in Japan.  Students were able to include some of these in their 1,000-word essays.

* Assessment:
   
* What do I need to adjust in the assessment task to allow more student success?
          1.  Walk students through quoting a passages from the book, documenting them using MLA In-Text Citation, and showing them how to create The Works Cited List. 
          2.  Teach a lesson on:  What is a quote?  Some students thought that a quote was only something one of the characters said in the book, and did not understand that the could quote any passage in the book.
          3.  Teach grammar:
               *  Over all, students' grammar is poor.  Students do not punctuate and capitalize correctly and write fragments.

  
* What interdisciplinary, if any, understandings were forged with other units based on the significant concept?
          1.  Each teacher at North Dade Middle School has a country.  Students learn about a particular  country in each classroom.  Therefore, they easily were able to include some of the differences and similarities between their own culture with those of other countries.  Students learned that "community" includes  their classroom community, their school community, their community in which they live, their city, their state, and their country, and most importantly, that they are citizens of the world.  (Note:  I changed my country from Pakistan to Holland this year and focused on the Environment of Holland - specifically water.   However, for culture and how the character lives, I still like to teach,
Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan, A Single Shard, by Linda Sue park, and Milkweed, by Jerry Spinelli for my 6th grade class.)  Since I have the same students in different grade levels, they will see how their own culture compares to the culture of the citizens of Holland in a future class.)
          2.  The Learner Profile - What makes a good citizen of the world?

Data Collection:
     *  What data am I collecting and how will it be used?
          1.  Grading student essays to see how well they respond to fictional and non-fictional texts, using the FCAT Writes Rubric.
          2.  Are students able to write a Compare and Contrast Essay?  Using the guideline given to students for writing such an essay.
          3.  FCAT Benchmark quizzes and tests -  main focus will be on main idea, author's purpose, compare and contrast, cause and effect, fact and opinion, and  patterns of organization to gather reading comprehension percentages with 75% as mastery.
          4.  For the 1000- word essay, Criteria A and Criteria B for Language A will be used, as well as the grading scale of 0 to 10 used for IBO schools at the high school level.          




1.  Novel: 
Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan
2.  Computer Lab:  Internet research on cultural aspects of India
3.  Using the DVI port for hooking the computer to the TV so students may see cultural aspects of India on TV.
4.  Dictionary to look up and define new vocabulary words.
5.  Overhead projector to show Tagore poems
6.  Handout:  "Dowry in India"
Resources
Scroll Down to See All Unit Plans
UNIT PLANNING IN THE IB-MYP THROUGH INQUIRY

Unit title: Commonalities and Differences in Culture: In India and Your Culture
Mrs. Carlson-Yellen
Language Arts for Gifted
6th Grade
8.5 Weeks
             Area of Interaction Focus:
Community and Service:  Students will learn how their cultural communities consisting of home, school, family, city and country are different and/or similar to the cultural communities of the fictional character, Koly, in India.
Finding the Big Idea (Significant Concept): From reading Hoot, by Gloria Whelan, students will see that even though there are many differences between their culture and the culture of India there are basic human commonalities that are the same, such as wanting to have a happy and successful life.
                    Significant Concept:
Over the years I want my students to retain the concept that even though cultures in different societies or communities are different, there are human commonalities among the many peoples of the world.
Unit Question:
What commonalities may exist across cultures as well as differences among them?
FROM ASSESSMENT TO TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES THROUGH INQUIRY
Assessment Reflections:
*The exemplars that students will see so that they understand what is required are:
1.  Students will read in class pages R45 - R48 of the
Writing Handbook in McDougal Littell's The Language of Literature
*  to understand that expository, or explanatory writing, informs and explains.
*  to be able to write a Compare and Contrast Essay
*  to refer to these reference pages in order to set up their pattern of organization when writing their expository essay

2.  Students will read R54 and R55  in the same textbook
*  to understand how to document their sources for in-text parenthetical documentation and for their Works Cited List.

3.  Students will listen to different paragraphs from students' Compare and Contrast Essays as they are orally presented by their classmates in front of the class to hear what they have to say about the similarities and differences of their own culture and that of Koly's cultural experiences in India, as understood from reading
Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan.

4.  While reading
Homeless Bird aloud in class, we will discuss how the author presents what the cultural expectations are for Koly as a 13-year-old girl in India and the trials and tribulations she must go through as a widow in India.

5.  Students will read about the social issue of dowry in India and Pakistan.  (Note: Students will understand that Pakistan was once part of India and did not become the country it is today until 1956.)  Students will be given a handout on the problem of dowry in India and will also investigate this social issue when we have the portable computer lab. They will see that there are citizens in both India and Pakistan that feel this custom is wrong, because in certain cases, it leads to bride burning in rural areas of both countries.

6.  Students will use the computer lab to research and discuss other issues and topics covered in
Homeless Bird, such as the homeless widows of Vrindavan (also in a handout), embroidery, the sacred Ganges River, arranged marriages, and rites and customs of marriages and funerals, and India's Nobel Prize winning poet, Tagore.

7.  Students will read the poem, by Tagore, on which Gloria Whelan based the title of this book.
*Students will have the opportunity to answer the unit question during the unit, using what they have learned, by doing the following:
1.  Write about:
*  Core values
*  Girls - what gifts would they give to their future husbands if dowry existed in the United States?
*  Boys - what gifts would they expect to receive from their future brides if dowry existed in the U.S.?
*  What do they think about the practice of dowry in India?
*  What would they do if their parents did not approve of their fiance?
*  The similarities and differences between their culture and India's culture.

2.  Discuss in class:
*  The pros and cons about arranged marriages.
*  Wedding customs in India and the United States
*  Education:  The power of knowing how to read.
*  Funeral customs and practices in India and the United States
*  Homelessness
*  Widows in India
*  Who was Tagore?
*  Forms of transportation in India and the U.S. 
*  The importance of being able to support oneself.

3.  Bring in:
*  Samples of clothing, or home decor, that is embroidered
*  Student drawn pictures of wedding attire for an Indian bride.


 
*Considerations given for the nature of the assessment:
1.  Students will look at the affects of dowry in India and Pakistan..  Students will see that the government has passed laws against the practice of dowry, but the tradition is still very much a custom of India and Pakistan.  1 Block

2.  Students will write an essay about dowry in India.  Home Learning.

3.  Students will read
Homeless Bird aloud in class so that all students will know what is going on in the story.  5 Weeks

4.  Open-notes pop quizzes, and two tests, including an end of the novel unit test, will be given for reading comprehension of
Homeless Bird.  

5.  For the essay -- What commonalities may exist across cultures as well as differences among them?  Students will be given guidance for comparing and contrasting cultural similarities and differences between the United States and India.   Using the computer and the television set, the teacher will show pictures of the Ganges River, Varanasi and Vrindavan, bridal attire and an Indian wedding, and a rickshaw.  The teacher will also give students an example of a compare and contrast essay.  The students will first write a compare and contrast essay on the culture of India and the U.S.. The purpose of this writing exercise  is for students to learn that they can write  a long essay to prepare them to write an
essay  of 500 to 1000 words. The students will then write the final essay, using their compare and contrast essay as reference for process writing. 
2 Block periods and 2 weeks (due to calendar school-wide  activities and 8th grade field trips.

6.  STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN ONE-ON-ONE  GUIDANCE TO IMPROVE THEIR WRITING FOR PROCESS WRITING.
1 Block

7.  Students will use the computer lab to:
*  read current news articles on the Internet about India.
*  read about cultural aspects of India.
2 Blocks

8.  Vocabulary Lessons:  Students will use dictionaries to look up new words and write the definitions down in their vocabulary section of their notebooks.  Students will take notes on the meanings of Indian words and phrases as they read.  Students will add defined new words to their list of words.
Five .5 hour lessons




*The level of Bloom's Taxonomy that the task asks the student to engage: 
1.  Synthesis:  The student will apply learned knowledge to create an original essay
2.  Evaluation:  The student will  interpret, compare and contrast, evaluate, and justify his or her own personal answer to the guiding question and relate it to what they learned about the culture in India through reading the literature as they compare and contrast it to their own culture.
*The task for this assessment will allow students to reach the highest descriptors. Students will create an original essay with no right or wrong answers, but they must justify their own personal interpretations with examples from the novel, Homeless Bird, and analyze the concepts of commonalities and differences between their culture and Koly's culture in India.
*What MYP task will be most appropriate and what will it look like?
Students respond to a range of texts, representing a range of contrasting viewpoints on a moral issue and social reality by writing an expository  essay of 500 to 1000 words.  Note:  Students will use MLA in-text citation.
*Which MYP objectives will be addressed and which criteria will you assess this task with?
#5  Students will begin to express an informed personal response to literary and non-literary texts and demonstrate the ability to approach age-appropriate works independently.  This task will be assessed with Criteria A and Criteria B.

*What state, provencial, district, or local standards/skills are to be addressed in the entire unit, not just the task?
LA.A.2.3.1  THE STUDENT DETERMINES THE MAIN IDEA OR ESSENTIAL MESSAGE IN A TEXT AND IDENTIFIES RELEVANT DETAILS AND FACTS AND PATTERNS OF ORGANIZATION.
LA.A.2.2.7  THE STUDENT RECOGNIZES THE USE OF COMPARISON AND CONTRAST IN A TEXT.
LA.B.2.3.1  THE STUDENT WRITES TEXT, NOTES, OUTLINES, COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS THAT DEMONSTRATE COMPREHENSION OF CONTENT AND EXPERIENCES FROM A VARIETY OF MEDIA
LA.C.3.3.1  THE STUDENT UNDERSTANDS HOW VOLUME, STRESS, PACING, AND PRONUNCIATION CAN POSITIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AFFECT AN ORAL PRESENTATION.
LA.C.1.3.`  THE STUDENT LISTENS AND USES INFORMATION GAINED FOR A VARIETY OF PURPOSES, SUCH AS GAINING INFORMATION FROM INTERVIEWS, FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS, AND PURSUING A PERSONAL INTEREST.
LA.E.1.3.1  THE STUDENT IDENTIFIES THE DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS OF CLASSIC LITERATURE, SUCH AS TIMELESSNESS, DEALING WITH UNIVERSAL THEMES, AND EXPERIENCES AND COMMUNICATING ACROSS CULTURES.
LA.E.1.3.5  THE STUDENT IDENTIFIES COMMON THEMES IN LITERATURE.
LA.E.1.3.2  THE STUDENT RECOGNIZES COMPLEX ELEMENTS OF PLOT, INCLUDING SETTIN, CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT, CONFLICTS, AND RESOLUTIONS.
LA..E.2.3.2  THE STUDENT RESPONDS TO A WORK OF LITERATURE BY INTERPRETING SELECTED PHRASES, SENTENCES, OR PASSAGES AND APPLYING THE INFORMATION TO PERSONAL LIFE.
LA.E.2.3.4  THE STUDENT KNOWS WAYS IN WHICH LITERATURE REFLECTS THE DIVERSE VOICES OF PEOPLE FROM VARIOUS BACKGROUNDS.
LA.B.1.3.2  THE STUDENT DRAFTS AND REVISES WRITING THAT IS PURPOSEFUL AND REFLECTS INSIGHT INTO THE WRITING SITUATION. 
*Approaches to Learning (Skills):
Every MYP unit will be based on approaches to learning which is an Area of Interaction.  However, the significant concept (listed above) dictates that we use one of the four other Areas of Interaction as the focus of the unit to make learning relevant for the situation. 
(For this unit, it will be Community and Service because students will compare their own culture to India's culture to see the commonalities and differences.)

*List the Approaches to Learning;
You will find these skills in the MYP Criteria for which you are using to assess your MYP task.  These Criteria will match up with the MYP objectives listed above.  Only list those skills that you are focusing on in the MYP task.

(For Criteria A and B)
1.  Reviewing new vocabulary using a dictionary
2.  Discussing different approaches
     *  how to write a thesis statement
     *  how to write a good paragraph
     *  how to write an 8 page essay
     *  how to write a compare and contrast essay
     *  the etiquette required for an oral presentation
3.  Expressing thoughts, feelings and opinions in writing
4.  How to write a compare and contrast essay
4.  Using electronic sources to locate information with the portable lab
5.  Using graphic organizers
     *  Venn Diagram for compare and contrast
     *  two-column notes for
In-text and Explanation (figurative language)
6.  Summarizing passages for comprehension
7.  Identifying key issues
8.  Fluency of ideas and elaboration for support
9.  Utilizing organizational skills

     
*Learning Experiences and Teaching Strategies:
(These are common agreements that all teachers teaching this unit will agree to.  Other strategies may be used individually by teachers in their own classrooms.) 
*How will you incorporate international mindedness throughout the unit?
     * 
By encouraging students to consider multiple perspectives through discussion and reading of fiction and non-fiction-texts
     *  Discuss that the tradition of arranged marriages are a part of many different cultures, (There have been instances in the Deep South of arranged and/or encouraged marriages for economic purposes (especially after the Civil War,)  In arranged marriages, the divorce rate is 50% lower than that of the United States where people choose who they wish to marry.   Parents want to make the best marriage arrangements for their daughters.
     *  People throughout the world want the basic necessities of shelter, food and clothing.
     *  Skills, such as hand embroidery, can be profitable in the United States and may have an element of elegance and prestige.  Some family heirlooms consist of embroidered linens. with the family crest.
     *  Reflect on the landmark event of having the first African American President-elect/President in relation to the changing racial perceptions of our national and worldwide community.  Discuss what causes prejudice. 
     *  Discuss how cultural beliefs may create prejudice among societies and communities. 
     *  Discuss what causes homelessness in our society.  Discuss prejudicial beliefs about the homeless people in the United States.
     *  Research how widows are treated worldwide.  

*How will the students learn the knowledge and practice the skills required? 
     *
Having an understanding the concept of "commonalities."
     *  Awareness of how a culture of a community affects the lives of its citizens.

     *
Students should have a thorough knowledge of the text and will receive diagnostic reading quizzes and tests, based on FCAT Benchmarks, to measure that knowledge. 
     *  Students should have an understanding of the general format of a compare and contrast essay.  They will acquire this by teacher model-guidance, writing several essays, peer-grading and editing of essays, and rewriting essays for Summative Assessment.

*How will we use formative assessment to give students feedback during the unit?  What are they?
    
*  Diagnostic reading quizzes will enable the teacher to tailor understanding of the text.
     *  There will be teacher/student interviews and conversations about the different parts of the writing process to gage understanding and development.

*What different teaching methodologies will we employ?  How are we differentiating teaching and learning for all?
   
*  Use of activities that require different intelligences (verbal, visual, interpersonal, and kinesthetic)
     *  Pair share
     *  Use of diagrams and visuals to help in developing an essay
     *  Use of shared inquiry


Ongoing Reflections and Evaluation
*Students and teachers:
    
* What did we find compelling?
          1.  Students learned that in some places in the world there are arranged marriages.
          2.  Students were concerned about the widows of India. 
               *  Relatives view widows as a burden financially. 
               *  Widows  believe that if they die in Vrindavan, they will not suffer the same fate in their next life.  
          3.  The fact that Koly could read.
               *  Generally, women in rural parts of India never learn to read.  
               *  That Koly's father-in-law taught her to read and introduced her to Tagore.
          4.  The River Ganges is considered a holy river, and people________________
               *  bathe in it.
               *  wash their clothes in it.
               *  believe that if you just touch it all of your sins will be washed away.
               *  believe that it can cure ilnesses and diseases.
               *  that the river has the ability to cleanse itself, and stays fresh for a long time.

    
* What learner-initiated inquiries arose during the learning? 
          1.  What kinds of wedding customs are there in different parts of the world?
          2.  How are the wedding customs in India different from ours?
          3.  How are the funeral customs in India different from ours?
          4.  Does the River Ganges cure diseases?
          5.  How are widows in the United States treated differently than in India?
          6.  What is a Rickshaw?  Do people still use them to travel in?
          7.  How many people can read in India? 
          8.  Who is Tagore?
          9.  Do any widows in India ever remarry?
        10.  What kind of animals live in India?
             
    
* From the evidence, what new student understandings may have been constructed?
          1.  From their 1,000-word essays, they were able to explain the differences and the similarities between their culture and Koly's in India. 
          2.  In addition, some were able to include other differences and similarities between their culture and those of the different countries they are learning about in other classes, such as Japan in their social studies/ humanities class.
       
   
    
* How did we deepen our understanding of the focus Areas of Interaction?
          1.  The Area of Interaction was Community and Service. 
               *  Students learned that their society and community is different from Koly's. but the basic needs are the same.
          2.  Students were able to live vicariously through Koly to understand what her life was like in India.
          3.  Students understood that people all over the world want to live a good life and marriage, and want to be loved.

   
* What opportunities exist for reflection - both within the unit and on our own learning?
          1.  What if I never saw my own family again?
          2.  What if I had to get married at the age of 13? 
          3.  What talents do I already have that would help me earn a living/
          4.  What if my parents did not approve of who I wanted to marry?
          5.  What if I did not know how to read? 
          6.  How would I go about teaching someone how to read?
          6.  Koly found solace and fortitude in the book of poems, by Tagore.  Is there a poem or a song that has special meaning to You?
 
    
* What, if any, extension activities arose?
          1.  Drawing a map of where Koly lived and the cities she traveled to.
          2.  Drawing of wedding attire for a couple in India.
          3.  Understanding where the title of the book came from by looking at some of Tagore's poems.
          4.  Sharing embroidered items.


* Collaboration: 
     Ms. de Armendi taught a unit on what makes a society.   Since her country is Japan, she taught students what the customs and traditions are in Japan.  Students were able to include some of these in their 1,000-word essays.

* Assessment:
   
* What do I need to adjust in the assessment task to allow more student success?
          1.  Walk students through quoting a passages from the book, documenting them using MLA In-Text Citation, and showing them how to create The Works Cited List. 
          2.  Teach a lesson on:  What is a quote?  Some students thought that a quote was only something one of the characters said in the book, and did not understand that the could quote any passage in the book.
          3.  Teach grammar:
               *  Over all, students' grammar is poor.  Students do not punctuate and capitalize correctly and write fragments.

  
* What interdisciplinary, if any, understandings were forged with other units based on the significant concept?
          1.  Each teacher at North Dade Middle School has a country.  Students learn about a particular  country in each classroom.  Therefore, they easily were able to include some of the differences and similarities between their own culture with those of other countries.  Students learned that "community" includes  their classroom community, their school community, their community in which they live, their city, their state, and their country, and most importantly, that they are citizens of the world.  (Note:  I changed my country from Pakistan to Holland this year and focused on the Environment of Holland - specifically water.   However, for culture and how the character lives, I still like to teach,
Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan, A Single Shard, by Linda Sue park, and Milkweed, by Jerry Spinelli for my 6th grade class.)  Since I have the same students in different grade levels, they will see how their own culture compares to the culture of the citizens of Holland in a future class.)
          2.  The Learner Profile - What makes a good citizen of the world?

Data Collection:
     *  What data am I collecting and how will it be used?
          1.  Grading student essays to see how well they respond to fictional and non-fictional texts, using the FCAT Writes Rubric.
          2.  Are students able to write a Compare and Contrast Essay?  Using the guideline given to students for writing such an essay.
          3.  FCAT Benchmark quizzes and tests -  main focus will be on main idea, author's purpose, compare and contrast, cause and effect, fact and opinion, and  patterns of organization to gather reading comprehension percentages with 75% as mastery.
          4.  For the 1000- word essay, Criteria A and Criteria B for Language A will be used, as well as the grading scale of 0 to 10 used for IBO schools at the high school level.          




1.  Novel: 
Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan
2.  Computer Lab:  Internet research on cultural aspects of India
3.  Using the DVI port for hooking the computer to the TV so students may see cultural aspects of India on TV.
4.  Dictionary to look up and define new vocabulary words.
5.  Overhead projector to show Tagore poems
6.  Handout:  "Dowry in India"
Resources
UNIT PLANNING IN THE IB-MYP THROUGH INQUIRY